Glendale Dog Bite Attorney

An individual who suffers through an animal attack will likely struggle with both physical and emotional injuries. The physical injuries can be healed through doctor visits or even plastic surgery. The emotional scars, however, could take years to heal — if ever. As your attorney, it is our goal to fight for your full and fair compensation for the injuries you have sustained from a dog attack.

Since 1993, our Glendale dog bite attorneys at The Law Offices of John Phebus have guided clients through the process of recovering monetary compensation. When a dog bites or attacks a person, the owner can be held liable for the damages. This liability is often covered by the dog owner’s homeowners insurance.

Many people are uneasy with the idea of suing a neighbor or friend to recover compensation for a dog attack. Let us handle the legality of the situation. We will work directly with the insurance carrier to negotiate a beneficial settlement that includes damages for lost wages, medical treatment, and pain and suffering. Schedule a free consultation at our offices with our Glendale personal injury lawyer to discuss your unique situation in greater detail.

Peoria Animal Attack Lawyers

An animal attack can encompass bites, scratches or knockdowns. Attacks can lead to numerous serious injuries, including:

  • Broken bones
  • Multiple lacerations
  • Tendon or ligament damage
  • Torn muscle
  • Infection

In addition to adults, our Glendale dog bite lawyers represent clients who have had their children attacked by a dog. Children are more susceptible to attack by virtue of their playful nature and inability to recognize an animal’s warning signs. To a small child, a dog bite can be life-threatening and lead to lifelong scarring. It is wise to seek the counsel of an experienced personal injury attorney as soon as possible.

Dog Bite Statistics in Arizona

Serious dog attacks happen more often than many people realize. Dog bites are a significant public health concern and one of the top 12 causes of nonfatal injuries in the world. The Arizona Department of Health Services reported over 34,000 emergency room visits for dog bite injuries in five years. Dog bites caused an estimated $55 million in medical care for victims in Arizona during this time. More than 70% of serious dog bite injuries occurred in residences.

Open wounds are the most common reason for dog-related emergency department visits in Arizona. From 2008 to 2012 (the most recent year data is available), Arizona had 4,881 cases of open wounds on the hand, 3,601 for open wounds on the lower extremities, 3,374 on forearms, 2,854 on fingers, 2,473 on lips, 1,669 on cheeks and 789 on faces. About 25% of dog-bite injury patients in Arizona received tetanus shots on top of other treatments.

Dog Bite Laws in Arizona

Arizona Revised Statute 11-1025 states that if a dog attack occurs when the victim is lawfully on private property or in a public place, the owner of the pet will be liable for damages regardless of fault. It will not matter whether the pet owner was negligent or should reasonably have known of the dog’s propensity for violence; the owner will be legally responsible. The only exceptions are if the victim provoked the pet, the dog was defending someone or if the dog was acting within an official law enforcement capacity at the time of the attack.

After a dog bite injury, you may have the right to file a claim against a dog owner in Arizona if you were not trespassing and did not harass the dog to instigate the attack. You have two years from the date of the attack to file your personal injury lawsuit. If a loved one died in a violent dog attack, you have two years from the date of death. A Glendale dog bite attorney may be able to help you bring your claim and prove a pet owner’s responsibility for your damages in Arizona. Call today to begin with a free consultation.

What to Do After a Dog Bite Accident

If you become the victim of a dog attack in Arizona, get information while at the scene. Get the pet owner’s name and phone number. Take a photo of the dog, if you can, and ask for general veterinarian information, such as if the dog is up to date on its shots. Clean out the wound gently with antibacterial soap and water right away. Dogs can carry more than 60 types of bacteria in their mouths.

Go to the hospital and explain what happened. You may need specific treatments such as wound debridement, antibiotics, or rabies and tetanus shots. Take photographs of your dog bite wound to serve as proof for an insurance claim later. Request copies of your medical reports from the hospital before you leave. Once you have received treatment, contact the local authorities about the dog.

You should report serious dog attacks that involve debilitating injuries, expensive medical care, permanent scars or disfigurement in Arizona. Report to your local animal control agency with the name of the pet owner and a description of the dog. The agency may need to investigate the incident and quarantine the animal to test for diseases.

If the agency releases the dog back to the owner but deems it dangerous, the owner may need to take additional steps to control the animal in the future. Reporting your attack could help prevent tragedies. Next, contact our attorneys for a free dog bite injury consultation. Arizona’s dog bite laws may entitle you to compensation for your medical bills and other damages. A successful claim could hold a negligent pet owner responsible.

Contact Our Firm

If you have questions regarding dog bite injuries, schedule a free consultation at The Law Offices of John Phebus. Our firm can be reached by calling 623-847-7117 or by completing our online contact form. Our office hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Monday through Friday. Evening and weekend appointments are available based on the needs of our clients.