Special Ignition Interlock Restricted Driver License in Arizona

If you are convicted of a driving under the influence (DUI) offense or related violation in Arizona, you may be eligible for a special ignition interlock restricted driver license (SIIRDL). This is a driver’s license with specific restrictions given alongside an ignition interlock device. A SIIRDL can restore your driving privileges, with restrictions, during a period of license suspension or revocation after a DUI.

What Is a SIIRDL?

According to Arizona Revised Statutes Section 28-1401, special ignition interlock restricted driver licenses can be issued to drivers who have ignition interlock devices installed due to DUI-related convictions. SIIRDLs allow drivers to continue operating their motor vehicles for the duration of the penalty period, with restrictions.

SIIRDLs go hand-in-hand with ignition interlock devices. An ignition interlock device prevents an engine from starting until the driver blows into the device and registers a 0.00% blood alcohol concentration level. Many drivers in Arizona who are convicted of driving under the influence and other DUI-related violations have to use ignition interlock devices for several months or longer.

Eligible parties may be able to obtain SIIRDLs rather than having fully suspended or revoked drivers’ licenses. These special licenses allow recipients to keep driving, with special restrictions. They are strictly voluntary for eligible people. It is something you must specifically apply for to receive in Arizona.

Who Is Eligible to Receive a Special Restricted Driver’s License?

Only certain drivers who have been convicted of DUI-related violations on or after February 1, 2006 in Arizona are eligible for special ignition interlock restricted driver licenses. According to state law, a driver may be eligible to apply for a SIIRDL if he or she checks all of the following boxes:

  • The driver installed an ignition interlock device on his or her vehicle and gave the Motor Vehicle Division (MVD) a Proof of Install form.
  • The driver has no outstanding withdrawal actions on his or her driving record.
  • The driver has complied with any requirements to attend alcohol or drug treatment programs and submitted proof of completion to the MVD.
  • The driver has purchased SR-22 automobile insurance and shown proof of future financial responsibility to the MVD.
  • The driver has contacted the MVD to verify his or her eligibility.
  • The driver has paid any and all applicable SIIRDL fees.

If you meet these requirements, you can ask the MVD for a special ignition interlock restricted driver license to recover some of your driving privileges for the duration of your suspension/revocation.

Driving Restrictions

SIIRDLs come with very specific driving restrictions that limit when and where a driver can drive. With a SIIRDL, you may only drive between your residence and:

  • Your place of employment during specific times of day
  • Your school
  • A health professional’s office
  • A screening, education or treatment facility for scheduled appointments
  • Your probation officer’s office for scheduled appointments
  • A certified ignition interlock device service facility
  • A location designated for parenting time
  • To drive a dependent who is living with you to a place of employment, school or a medical appointment.

If you violate the restrictions of your SIIRDL, you can get it taken away, along with your driving privileges.

What Happens When My SIIRDL Expires?

A special ignition interlock restricted driver license is only valid for a specific period of time – only during the period of suspension or revocation. Once your SIIRDL expires, it is against the law for you to operate your motor vehicle until you have complied with Arizona’s requirements.

You must visit an MVD office and apply to reinstate your driving privileges, along with paying any fees. You may also be required to complete a revocation application, continue your SR-22 insurance and/or keep your ignition interlock device.

For assistance applying for a special ignition interlock restricted driver license in Arizona, contact an attorney.